6 Mistakes That Small Streamers Make

6 mistakes that small streamers make

We have worked with many small streamers over the years. During this time it’s not uncommon for us to notice the same mistakes happening time and time again. We always try to advise our clients if we notice any of these errors, and we want to highlight 6 key mistakes that small streamers make.

Substandard stream quality for Audio, Video, or Lighting

With the amount of streamers growing every day it’s more important than ever to get the basics right. Starting with the Audio, you don’t have to spend hundreds of dollars on audio equipment at the beginning. Something like a Blue Yeti or AT2020. Combine this with the correct microphone position, some thought for your recording space and your already on your way to great sounding audio.


The same concept applies to Video. Make sure that your internet connection is quick enough for streaming and your computer can handle the encoding. From here there are a few tweaks that can help keep your stream running smooth.


  • Determine the maximum stable bit rate you can manage with your internet connection using a trusted speed test.

  • If you have transcoding options on your broadcast, use that maximum value, up to 6000, for your bitrate.

  • Pick a 16×9 resolution on your stream: 1080p (1920×1080), 900p(1600×900) 720p (1280×720) leaning towards 720p as a starting point

  • Pick a frame rate between 24 and 60 fps. 30 FPS is a solid starting point.
 

When it comes to lighting soft box lighting is recommended. A soft box is a light modifier that reduces dark shadows and softens any harsh lighting. Great lighting is especially important if you are planning to use a green screen while streaming. Taking time to fix your lighting can help make your stream look more professional and stand out.

Not interacting with your viewers

When first starting, new viewers might be few and far between. This is completely normal and the first step on the journey of a Twitch streamer. People come to Twitch because they are looking to connect with other streamers and viewers who share their passion. As a streamer you have the perfect opportunity to get them involved in your stream.
 
By calling them out by name, recognizing their contributions and asking questions you can start to build a community around your stream. This helps to make your viewers feel like they are part of the stream.
 

Recognize their contributions and ask questions!

When you have viewers in your stream why not ask them; why they stopped by? or What caught their attention? By increasing interactivity with your audience you help to keep your viewers coming back time and time again.

Not utilizing social media presence

Building a following on Twitch is great but not interacting with them when you are not streaming is a missed opportunity. There are a ton of social media platforms but some that seem to stand out for our clients are Twitter, Discord and Facebook. We would advise at least signing up for these with the aim to keep your social handles the same across the board.
 
Interacting with your community while you are away from keyboard (AFK) to ask questions, share memorable moments and post when you are next going live is a fantastic use of the platforms.
 
As mentioned above be sure to keep brand consistency across all platforms, using the same social media handle. We would advise keeping the artwork similar and something such as our custom package can help with this.

Using copyrighted material

A simple rule but something overlooked is if you don’t own it or have a license, don’t use it. With both Twitch and YouTube clamping down on copyrighted material more frequently, especially music we always advise caution. With this in mind there some resources available to streamers, royalty free.
 
 

Music

With one of the better catalogs of music Epidemic Sound offers over 30,000 tracks of royalty-free music in several genres and is compatible with Spotify and even stream alerts.
 
With over 100,000 tracks Jingle Punks is a gold mine. Included within a Streamlabs Prime subscription (which give access to other items) with some fantastic ready built playlists based on genre.
 
Paid – Monstercat
One of the most recognizable names in Royalty Free music. For $5 a month you can download and stream thousands of Monstercat songs from your favorite artists with no fear of DMCA claims or strikes.
 
 

Fonts

One of the more unknown or passed over copyright infringements is with font usage. With a plethora of great royalty free resources for fonts this should be an easy fix.
 
Typically, we would recommend using Google Fonts due to the size of the font catalog and that they are already integrated into tools such as stream labs and stream elements

Choose the right Font

Don’t Play Over saturated Games

Although this isn’t a hard and fast rule we would always suggest to play games that you enjoy. Most streamers start out doing this as a hobby, it helps to find a genre or a specific game that you enjoy and focusing on that. If you want to play the latest releases or a saturated game it would be best to fit this into your schedule instead of focusing on it. Failing that another idea would be to find games that have many viewers but few people streaming. We understand that this can be difficult due to the amount of people going live every minute. This is why we always come back to the same point, play games that you enjoy.

Not maximizing graphics for your stream

When first starting out most streamers fall into two categories. They either overlook their stream graphics or over compensate with distracting or low quality designs. The artwork that you use across your channel and social media plays a big part in explaining the style of streamer you are. We would suggest keeping a consistent theme evident throughout. Including your overlays, social media branding and alerts.
 
With a plethora of free designs available, new streamers don’t need to buy pre-made or custom designs when starting. If you are willing to throw a few bucks at a pre-made design this will add some consistency across the board. Theming everything needed to get started streaming is always a great step.
 
We would suggest to at least get a minimal stream overlay, some Twitch panels, an offline screen and a minimal logo. These can be swapped out at a later date but choosing a design that is pretty neutral and minimal does not tie you into a specific style.

Epic custom design

Want something unique designed based around your ideas?